Jul

1

Polychrome Beaker Vase with Design of Peony and Magnolia

By Ceramic Design Ideas



Polychrome Beaker Vase

Shunzhi Reign (1644-1661), Qing Dynasty (1644-1911)

In the Qing dynasty Shunzhi era, polychrome porcelain shapes retained the antique flavor of late Ming dynasty. Many vessels employed a strong contrast between vivid hues of vermillion and green boldly painted in unrestrained fashion. The body of this beaker vase (gu) has white glaze with blue-green specks, polychrome-painted with distinct images of irregular rocks, flowers, and other designs. Each color is vibrant, with visual effects presented clearly with a refined sense of beauty.

May

11

White-glazed Incense Burner

By Ceramic Design



 White-glazed-Incense-Burner

White-glazed Incense Burner

Qianlong reign (1736-1795), Qing dynasty (1644-1911)
Height: 10.8 cm
Mouth diameter: 11.8 cm
Foot diameter: 8.5 cm

The round incense burner has straight sides, a raised transverse ridge on the stomach, three legs and a flat bottom. The foot is unglazed with a rough texture. The interior is glazed except the base. The white-glazed exterior is decorated with a text written in brown, meaning “Honorable grandfather Lu Yaoyu and grandmother Lady Zhao, Honorable grandfather Gao Wenbu and grandmother Lady Chen, my Honorable grandfather Zhengzhai and grandmother Lady Lin, written in 1782 (Qianlong 47th year)”.
  According to the inscription, this incense burner was a device used during sacrificial activities.

May

11

Prunus Vase with Sky-clearing-red Glaze

By Ceramic Design



Prunus Vase with Sky-clearing-red Glaze

Kangxi Reign (1662-1722), Qing Dynasty (1644-1911)
Height: 24.2 cm
Mouth diameter: 3.4 cm
Foot diameter: 7.8 cm

Covered with sky-clearing-red glaze, the vase has a small mouth, a short neck, wide shoulders, a slightly downward tapering body and a white nephrite-disk-shaped bottom, on which is written a blue-and-white seal in regular script with the date of manufacture: “Made in Kangxi period of Qing dynasty”. The seal has no borders. The regular-shaped and uniformly-glazed vase indicates that the high temperature copper-red porcelain, which failed to be handed down from the middle period of the Ming dynasty, was rejuvenated in the Jingdezhen imperial kiln during the Kangxi reign.
  The main kinds of high temperature copper-red glaze in the Kangxi period are sky-clearing red, lang-kiln red and kidney-bean red, each with a distinct identity. Characterized by uniform glaze and rich color, sky-clearing-red ware, besides serving as sacrificial vessels, were also used for implements in the scholar’s studio and for objects of daily use.

Feb

18

14th century development Blue and white porcelain

By Ceramic Design



In the early 14th century mass-production of fine, translucent, blue and white porcelain started at Jingdezhen, sometimes called the porcelain capital of China. This development was due to the combination of Chinese techniques and Islamic trade. The new ware was made possible by the export of cobalt from Persia (called Huihui qing, 回回青, “Islamic blue”), combined with the translucent white quality of Chinese porcelain. Cobalt blue was considered as a precious commodity, with a value about twice that of gold.Motifs also draw inspiration from Islamic decorations. A large portion of these blue-and-white wares was then shipped to Southwest-Asian markets through the Muslim traders based in Guangzhou.

Chinese blue and white porcelain was once-fired: after the porcelain body was dried, decorated with refined cobalt-blue pigment mixed with water and applied using a brush, coated with a clear glaze and fired at high temperature. From the 16th century, local sources of cobalt blue started to be developed, although Persian cobalt remained the most expensive. Production of blue and white wares has continued at Jingdezhen to this day. Blue and white porcelain made at Jingdezhen probably reached the height of its technical excellence during the reign of the Kangxi emperor of the Qing Dynasty (reigned 1661 to 1722).