Jul

2

Large Green-glazed Plate Carved with Grape Design, Longquan Ware

By Ceramic Design Ideas



Large Green-glazed Plate

 

Ming Dynasty (1368-1644)

Longquan Kiln is located in Longquan city, Zhejiang province Starting porcelain manufacture in the Northern Song dynasty (960-1127), Longquan kilns are famous for celadon wares. Longquan wares of the Ming dynasty have a heavy body covered with a thick glaze layer. The dish displayed here is large in size. It is translucent green glazed and carved with a grape motif in the interior bottom. It is a refined celadon ware typifying early Ming dynasty Longquan wares.

May

11

Blue-and-white Prunus Vase with Flowers and Fruits

By Ceramic Design



 Blue-and-white Prunus Vase with Flowers and Fruits

Blue-and-white Prunus Vase with Flowers and Fruits

Yongle reign (1403-1424), Ming dynasty (1368-1644)
Height: 35.5 cm
Mouth diameter: 6.5 cm
Foot diameter: 14 cm

Blue-and-white Prunus Vase with Flowers and Fruits 1

The vase has a small mouth with everted rim, a short neck, wide shoulders, a slightly tapered stomach and a lid with a small knob. The exterior is covered with blue-and-white glaze, decorated with S-shaped cloud design on the shoulder and disconnected sprays of floral ornamentation, fruit patterns on the stomach, slightly upward lotus-petal design and acanthus design around the foot. On the top of the lid is a plantain leaf design and a flower-leaf pattern on the walls of the lid.

Blue-and-white Prunus Vase with Flowers and Fruits 2
  The Chinese prunus vase was prevalent from the Song dynasty (960-1272) to the 18th century. The short neck and small mouth of this prunus vase recalls a thin balustrade. In early days, prunus vases were made with a conical lid, indicating that they were utilitarian liquid containers. However, ornament and arrangement later became their priority function instead of utility. This one is characterized by delicate ornamentation and clear composition, which is the typical style of the Yongle porcelain.

May

11

Crimson Porcelain Bowl

By Ceramic Design



Crimson-Porcelain-Bowl

Crimson Porcelain Bowl

Xuande reign (1426-1435), Ming dynasty
Height: 8 cm
Mouth diameter: 18.9 cm
Foot diameter: 8 cm
Court collection

The red-glazed bowl has a flared-mouth, a swelling body and a foot ring. On the greenish-white glazed foot ring is printed a seal in blue-and-white with the date of manufacture written in regular script that translates, “Made in Xuande period of Ming dynasty”. The seal is enclosed with blue-and-white double borders.
  Red glazed ware technique flourished during Xuande reign in the Ming dynasty. Compared with red-glazed porcelain ware in Yongle period (1403-1424), those produced during the Xuande period enjoyed a significant increase in total number and have greater variety in glazes, such as ruby red, sacrificial red, sky-clearing red, and sang-de-bœuf. The red glaze in the Xuande period is rich and striking with a slight exposure of white on the edge which is pleasure to observe. Besides bowls, plates and high-footed bowls, more shapes were commonly seen, such as washers, incense burners, prunus vases, monk’s cap jugs, sauce-pots and pear-shaped pots. The porcelain ware is ornamented with incised designs and golden tracery. The rim of the mouth is left white, which is popularly called “Juncus effusus mouth”. Fired on its foot, the red-glazed bowl is darker bluish green where the glaze masses and bubbles are most dense at the thickest part. Typical features of Xuande red glaze are rich color, no signs of flow or of the glaze peeling off. After the Xuande period, the red glaze ware declined. It was not rejuvenated until the Kangxi reign (1662-1722) of the Qing dynasty.

Mar

12

White-glazed Bowl, Ding Ware

By Ceramic Design



White-glazed-Bowl-Ding-Ware

With a copper-rimmed wide mouth, deep, bow-shaped belly and a ring foot, the bowl has an offwhite glaze. It has several glaze drips that look like tear stains.

Cao Zhao, a connoisseur of the Ming dynasty, remarked in his book on connoisseurship, Discussing Antiquities Case by Case (Ko Ku Yao Lun) “old Ding ware always has tear stains on the exterior, otherwise they are fake”. The tear stain is a natural phenomenon during firing of the porcelain. Transparent glazes melt at a high temperature and flow vertically because of gravity. They become a wax-tear or glass-bead bulge where the glaze mass, which makes them look like tear stains. These marks are one of the most typical characteristics of white-glazed Ding ware. Read more »

Feb

26

Joseon Dynasty porcelain

By Ceramic Design



Joseon white porcelain and Buncheong

During the Joseon Dynasty, (1392–1910) ceramic ware was considered to represent the highest quality of achievement from imperial, city, and provincial kilns, the last of which were export-driven wares. This was the golden age of Korean pottery, with a long period of growth in imperial and provincial kilns, and much work of the highest quality still preserved.

Wares evolved along Chinese lines in terms of colour, shape, and technique. Celadon, white porcelain, and storage pottery were similar, but with slight variations in glazes, incision designs, florality, and weight. The Ming influence in blue and white wares using cobalt-blue glazes existed, but without the pthalo blue range, and the three-dimensional glassine colour depth of Ming Dynasty Chinese works.

Simplified designs emerged early on. Buddhist designs still prevailed in celadon wares: lotus flowers, and willow trees. The form most often seen was that of pear-shaped bottles. Notable were thinner glazes, and colourless glazes for buncheong or stoneware.
After the prolonged fall of the Ming dynasty, immigration of some Chinese master potters occurred in southern coastal Korea. Qing colouring, brighter and almost Scythian in enamel imitation, was rejected by Korean potters, in favour of simpler, less decorated wares in keeping with a new dynasty that built itself on military tradition.

Generally, the ceramics of this dynasty is divided into early, middle, and late periods, changing every two centuries, approximately; thus 1300 to 1500 is the early period, 1500 to 1700 the middle, and 1700 to 1900–1910 the late period.

The wares began to assume more traditional Korean glazes and more specific designs to meet regional needs. This is to be expected, as the Scythian art influences were of the former dynasty. The rise of white porcelain occurred as a result of Confucian influence and ideals, resulting in purer, less pretentious forms lacking artifice and complexity.

In 1592 during the Japanese invasion of Korea, entire villages of Korean potters were forcibly relocated to Japan permanently damaging the pottery industry as craftsmen had to relearn techniques because the masters were gone.