Jun

26

Red Pottery Bowl with Flat Bottom

By Ceramic Design Ideas



Red Pottery Bowl with Flat Bottom

Cishan Culture (ca. 6000-5600 BCE), Neolithic Era (ca. 10000- ca. 2000 BCE)

Pottery of the Cishan culture is dominated by red pottery, and the bowl is one of the most common forms. The Cishan culture is named after the village of Cishan, in Wu’an county, Hebei province, where the first finds of this type were made in 1972. It dates to the Northern China Middle Neolithic, 6000-5600 BC.

Jun

1

Ju Ware Bowl in the Shape of a Lotus

By Ceramic Design



Ju Ware Bowl in the Shape of a Lotus – Northern Sung period (960-1126).

Height: 10.4 cm, diameter: 16.2 cm, diameter of base: 8.1 cm, depth: 7.6 cm, weight: 465 g

Ju Ware Bowl in the Shape of a Lotus

This ten-lobed lotus bowl has gently curved sides, a subtly flaring rim, smooth transition from one petal lobe to the next, and a relatively tall ring foot. The blue-green glaze, from rim to the base, is uniformly thin and opaque, with fine crackling. During firing, this piece was supported by five tiny points underneath the ring foot, and these are the only parts of the body not covered by the glaze. At these points, it is possible to make out the grayish-yellow unglazed ceramic body.

May

11

Crimson Porcelain Bowl

By Ceramic Design



Crimson-Porcelain-Bowl

Crimson Porcelain Bowl

Xuande reign (1426-1435), Ming dynasty
Height: 8 cm
Mouth diameter: 18.9 cm
Foot diameter: 8 cm
Court collection

The red-glazed bowl has a flared-mouth, a swelling body and a foot ring. On the greenish-white glazed foot ring is printed a seal in blue-and-white with the date of manufacture written in regular script that translates, “Made in Xuande period of Ming dynasty”. The seal is enclosed with blue-and-white double borders.
  Red glazed ware technique flourished during Xuande reign in the Ming dynasty. Compared with red-glazed porcelain ware in Yongle period (1403-1424), those produced during the Xuande period enjoyed a significant increase in total number and have greater variety in glazes, such as ruby red, sacrificial red, sky-clearing red, and sang-de-bœuf. The red glaze in the Xuande period is rich and striking with a slight exposure of white on the edge which is pleasure to observe. Besides bowls, plates and high-footed bowls, more shapes were commonly seen, such as washers, incense burners, prunus vases, monk’s cap jugs, sauce-pots and pear-shaped pots. The porcelain ware is ornamented with incised designs and golden tracery. The rim of the mouth is left white, which is popularly called “Juncus effusus mouth”. Fired on its foot, the red-glazed bowl is darker bluish green where the glaze masses and bubbles are most dense at the thickest part. Typical features of Xuande red glaze are rich color, no signs of flow or of the glaze peeling off. After the Xuande period, the red glaze ware declined. It was not rejuvenated until the Kangxi reign (1662-1722) of the Qing dynasty.

Mar

12

White-glazed Bowl, Ding Ware

By Ceramic Design



White-glazed-Bowl-Ding-Ware

With a copper-rimmed wide mouth, deep, bow-shaped belly and a ring foot, the bowl has an offwhite glaze. It has several glaze drips that look like tear stains.

Cao Zhao, a connoisseur of the Ming dynasty, remarked in his book on connoisseurship, Discussing Antiquities Case by Case (Ko Ku Yao Lun) “old Ding ware always has tear stains on the exterior, otherwise they are fake”. The tear stain is a natural phenomenon during firing of the porcelain. Transparent glazes melt at a high temperature and flow vertically because of gravity. They become a wax-tear or glass-bead bulge where the glaze mass, which makes them look like tear stains. These marks are one of the most typical characteristics of white-glazed Ding ware. Read more »