Mar

22

Blue-and-white Flask with Ruyi-scepter Shaped Ears and Interlocking Lotus Design

By Ceramic Design Ideas



 

 

Blue-and-white Flask with Ruyi-scepter Shaped Ears and Interlocking Lotus Design

Qianlong Reign (1736-1795), Qing Dynasty (1644-1911)

This pot has a garlic-head shaped mouth and a pair of ruyi-shaped ears. The interior is glazed white while the exterior is painted with floral designs. This vessel was made for court use during the Qianlong era (1736-1795) at Jingdezhen imperial kiln. This flask reflects the popularity of antique style at that time.

Jan

3

Blue-and-white Prunus Vase with Flowers and Fruits

By Ceramic Design Ideas



Yongle reign (1403-1424), Ming dynasty (1368-1644)

The vase has a small mouth with everted rim, a short neck, wide shoulders, a slightly tapered stomach and a lid with a small knob. The exterior is covered with blue-and-white glaze, decorated with S-shaped cloud design on the shoulder and disconnected sprays of floral ornamentation, fruit patterns on the stomach, slightly upward lotus-petal design and acanthus design around the foot. On the top of the lid is a plantain leaf design and a flower-leaf pattern on the walls of the lid.
  The Chinese prunus vase was prevalent from the Song dynasty (960-1272) to the 18th century. The short neck and small mouth of this prunus vase recalls a thin balustrade. In early days, prunus vases were made with a conical lid, indicating that they were utilitarian liquid containers. However, ornament and arrangement later became their priority function instead of utility. This one is characterized by delicate ornamentation and clear composition, which is the typical style of the Yongle porcelain.

 Blue-and-white Prunus Vase with Flowers and Fruits

May

11

Blue-and-white Prunus Vase with Flowers and Fruits

By Ceramic Design



 Blue-and-white Prunus Vase with Flowers and Fruits

Blue-and-white Prunus Vase with Flowers and Fruits

Yongle reign (1403-1424), Ming dynasty (1368-1644)
Height: 35.5 cm
Mouth diameter: 6.5 cm
Foot diameter: 14 cm

Blue-and-white Prunus Vase with Flowers and Fruits 1

The vase has a small mouth with everted rim, a short neck, wide shoulders, a slightly tapered stomach and a lid with a small knob. The exterior is covered with blue-and-white glaze, decorated with S-shaped cloud design on the shoulder and disconnected sprays of floral ornamentation, fruit patterns on the stomach, slightly upward lotus-petal design and acanthus design around the foot. On the top of the lid is a plantain leaf design and a flower-leaf pattern on the walls of the lid.

Blue-and-white Prunus Vase with Flowers and Fruits 2
  The Chinese prunus vase was prevalent from the Song dynasty (960-1272) to the 18th century. The short neck and small mouth of this prunus vase recalls a thin balustrade. In early days, prunus vases were made with a conical lid, indicating that they were utilitarian liquid containers. However, ornament and arrangement later became their priority function instead of utility. This one is characterized by delicate ornamentation and clear composition, which is the typical style of the Yongle porcelain.

Feb

18

Tang and Song blue-and-white

By Ceramic Design



The first Chinese blue and white wares were as early as the ninth century in Henan province, China; although only shards have been discovered. Tang period blue-and-white is even rarer than Song blue-and-white and was unknown before 1985. The Tang pieces are not porcelain however, but rather earthenwares with greenish white slip, using cobalt blue pigments which probably originated in the Middle-East.The only three pieces of complete “Tang blue and white” in the world were recovered from Indonesian Belitung shipwreck in 1998 and later sold to Singapore.

Feb

14

Later trade of Chinese export porcelain

By Ceramic Design



As trade developed, finer quality wares were shipped by private traders who rented space on the Dutch East India Company ships. The bulk export wares of the 18th century were typically teawares and dinner services, often Blue and white decorated with flowers, pine, prunus, bamboo or with pagoda landscapes, a style that inspired the Willow pattern. They were sometimes clobbered (enamelled) in the Netherlands and England to enhance their decorative appeal. By the late 18th century, imports from China were in decline. Tastes were changing and competition from new European factories with mass-production brought about industrialisation took its toll.

Highly decorative Canton porcelain was produced throughout the 19th century but the quality of wares was in decline. By the end of the century, Blue and white wares in the Kangxi style were produced in large quantities and almost every earlier style and type was copied into the 20th century.