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Mar

22

Tricolor Pottery Ewer with a Phoenix-head Spout

By Ceramic Design Ideas



Tricolor Pottery Ewer with a Phoenix-head Spout

Tang Dynasty (618-907)

A symbol of authority and dignity, phoenix is a divine bird in ancient tales. It was a common decorative motif as well. Ewers with phoenix-head spouts proliferated in early Tang period (the early 7th century) as a common tricolor vessel type with conspicuous Persian style. It is an innovation for tricolor vessels to integrate alien culture with indigenous art.

Feb

26

Joseon Dynasty porcelain

By Ceramic Design



Joseon white porcelain and Buncheong

During the Joseon Dynasty, (1392–1910) ceramic ware was considered to represent the highest quality of achievement from imperial, city, and provincial kilns, the last of which were export-driven wares. This was the golden age of Korean pottery, with a long period of growth in imperial and provincial kilns, and much work of the highest quality still preserved.

Wares evolved along Chinese lines in terms of colour, shape, and technique. Celadon, white porcelain, and storage pottery were similar, but with slight variations in glazes, incision designs, florality, and weight. The Ming influence in blue and white wares using cobalt-blue glazes existed, but without the pthalo blue range, and the three-dimensional glassine colour depth of Ming Dynasty Chinese works.

Simplified designs emerged early on. Buddhist designs still prevailed in celadon wares: lotus flowers, and willow trees. The form most often seen was that of pear-shaped bottles. Notable were thinner glazes, and colourless glazes for buncheong or stoneware.
After the prolonged fall of the Ming dynasty, immigration of some Chinese master potters occurred in southern coastal Korea. Qing colouring, brighter and almost Scythian in enamel imitation, was rejected by Korean potters, in favour of simpler, less decorated wares in keeping with a new dynasty that built itself on military tradition.

Generally, the ceramics of this dynasty is divided into early, middle, and late periods, changing every two centuries, approximately; thus 1300 to 1500 is the early period, 1500 to 1700 the middle, and 1700 to 1900–1910 the late period.

The wares began to assume more traditional Korean glazes and more specific designs to meet regional needs. This is to be expected, as the Scythian art influences were of the former dynasty. The rise of white porcelain occurred as a result of Confucian influence and ideals, resulting in purer, less pretentious forms lacking artifice and complexity.

In 1592 during the Japanese invasion of Korea, entire villages of Korean potters were forcibly relocated to Japan permanently damaging the pottery industry as craftsmen had to relearn techniques because the masters were gone.

Feb

14

Wares and figures of Chinese export porcelain

By Ceramic Design



Although European crests on Chinese porcelain can be found as early as the 16th century, around 1700 the demand for Armorial porcelain dramatically increased. Thousands of services were ordered with drawings of individuals’ coats of arms being sent out to China to be copied and shipped back to Europe and, from the late 18th century, to North America. Some were lavishly painted in polychrome enamels and gilding, while others, particularly later, might just incorporate a small crest or monogram in blue and white. Chinese potters copied the popular Japanese Imari porcelains. Chinese Imari continued to be made for export into the second half of the 18th century, examples being recovered as part of the Nanking cargo from the wreck of the Geldermalsen.

 

Qing export porcelain with European Christian scene, 1725-1735.

A wide variety of shapes, some of Chinese or Islamic pottery origin, others copying Faience or metalwork were made. Oriental figures included Chinese gods and goddesses such as Guanyin (the goddess of mercy) and Budai (the god of contentment), figures with nodding heads, seated monks and laughing boys as well as figures of Dutch men and women. From the mid-18th century, even copies of Meissen figures such as Tyrolean dancers were made for export to Europe. Birds and animals, including cows, cranes, dogs, eagles, elephants, pheasants, monkeys and puppies, were popular.

From around 1720, the new Famille rose palette was adopted and quickly supplanted the earlier Famille verte porcelains of the Kangxi period. Famille rose enamels for the export market included the Mandarin Palette. Specific patterns such as tobacco leaf and faux tobacco leaf were popular as were, from around 1800, Canton decorated porcelain with its figures and birds, flowers and insects. Many other types of decoration such as encre de chine or Jesuist Wares, made for Christian missionaries, pieces with European subjects like the Judgment of Paris, or Adam and Eve, were made for the European market.

Feb

8

Han dynasty ceramic

By Ceramic Design



Han dynasty, 202 BC-220 AD

Painted pottery pot with raised reliefs of dragons and phoenixes, Western Han Dynasty (202 BC – 9 AD)

Some experts believe the first true porcelain was made in the province of Zhejiang during the Eastern Han period. Shards recovered from archaeological Eastern Han kiln sites estimated firing temperature ranged from 1260 to 1300 °C. As far back as 1000 BC, the so-called “Porcelaneous wares” or “proto-porcelain wares were made using at least some kaolin fired at high temperatures. The dividing line between the two and true porcelain wares is not a clear one. Archaeological finds have pushed the dates to as early as the Han Dynasty (206 BC – 220 AD).

The late Han years saw the early development of the peculiar art form of hunping, or “soul jar”: a funerary jar whose top was decorated by a sculptural composition. This type vessels became widespread during the following Jin Dynasty and the Six Dynasties.

Jun

9

Ceramic Money Boxs – Elephants

By Ceramic Design



We make hand-made and unique elephant money boxs with the trunk up, straight out, or downwards, depending upon the weather.

Well, you have to make the decision somehow.

Apr

15

Ceramics / pottery designer

By Ceramic Design



Pottery/Ceramics Designers (Ceramicists) combine creative, practical and technical skills in the design and production of original items such as plates, ornaments, pots and sculptures made by shaping, moulding and firing clay and other materials.

Ceramics designers and potters use a range of techniques and their creativity to make domestic (table and chinaware), decorative (ornaments and sculptures) or industrial (pipes, fittings, tiles) products from clay. Typical activities include:

  • generating original ideas;
  • producing sketches and sample designs;
  • preparing clay and other materials for use;
  • using kilns, a potter’s wheel and/or moulds to produce items;
  • using a variety of techniques to create finished products;
  • investigating and choosing appropriate production processes and materials (stoneware, earthenware, porcelain etc);
  • maintaining awareness of current design trends, fashion and influences;
  • liaising with suppliers, galleries, store buyers, clients etc;
  • undertaking market research, marketing and business development activities;
  • managing budgets and accounts;
  • running workshops/teaching classes;
  • giving demonstrations;
  • producing photographs, catalogues and/or design portfolios;
  • attending/displaying work at exhibitions and craft fairs;
  • selling products directly via galleries, craft shops, studios, the internet etc.

Most ceramicists are self-employed/freelance or work for large ceramics/pottery companies (including Denby, Wedgewood and Royal Doulton). For experienced designers, opportunities also arise with large retail chains (such as Ikea and Habitat), although such vacancies attract strong competition. Jobs are advertised via the Internet, in local and national newspapers and trade publications including Design Week, Ceramic Review and Design Nation. Speculative applications are worthwhile, for which it is essential to produce a sound portfolio of design work to demonstrate creative/practical skills.

Jun

9

Egg Pot – Jade

By Ceramic Design



This style is a basic egg shaped pot.  They look great sitting on a patio table, fence ledge or nested in the grass and filled with spring flowers.  Available in five generous sizes that really compliment each other when placed as a set.

egg-pot-jade.jpg

Imported from South China, these ceramic pieces of pottery are made from white bisque instead of clay.  Having this kind of a base to start with gives this piece an advantage when it comes to colorful and vibrant glazes.  Each one is considered high quality yet traditional.  Some of the finishes like the Copper and Bronze have great shine and sparkle.  Our Jade and Oxblood red are traditional glazes with a lovely crackle finish.  Of course we would not be stating the obvious if we didn’t point out the new tri color glazing called “Fire and Ice”.  All pots are high fired, waterproof and come with a drain hole.  The styles are classic and unique.

Jun

3

Ceramic jar

By Ceramic Design



Size: 10.5 ” 27X27X22CM

Decription: Ceramic jar; Ceramic reactive glaze jar with lid
Porcelain jar; Porcelain reactive glaze jar with lid
Decorative ceramic jar with lid
Bubble on the surface
For home decoration; Ceramic material
Good price, good control quality
Color should be changed as your specification
We can design as customer’s request

Ceramic jar

PACKING: 2 sets/ CTN
General packing ( inner box with 3-ply paper, master carton with 5 -ply paper, not including the styrofoam )
Safe packing ( inner & master carton with 5-ply paper, including the styrofoam, the thickness of styrofoam as per your request of drop test)
Color Box is available
PVC box is available

May

29

Ceramic Flower Pot garden Planter ceramic Pot

By Ceramic Design



ceramic-flower-pots.jpg

Ceramic Flower Pot, garden Planter, ceramic Pot
Garden Decoration
1) Artistical design
2) Vivil Color
3) Environmental
Ceramic Flower Pot, garden Planter, ceramic Pot ,Terra Cotta garden decoration
1, Material: Dolomite
2, Size & Color: optional
3, Available in various shapes and designs, Customized designs are accepted
4. Package : Standard export packing, or gift box or color box as clients’ requirement.
5. MOQ :1500pcs
6. Payment : L/C , T/T
7. Sample: We can open the new sample according to buyers’ original samples and requirement, the lead time will be 12 days.
8. Keywords: Ceramic Flower Pot, Ceramic Pot, Porcelain Flower Planter, Garden Pot, terra cotta garden decoration
Our main Products:
      Ceramic, resin, ironware and cement items
      Seasonal gifts: Christmas; Hallowmas; Easter; Valentine; Spring festival; Wind-bells
      Home and Garden Decoration
      Angel design
Ceramic Mug, Coffee cup, Sealed Jar, Tableware and Dinnerware
Religion Appliances, and so on

May

29

Ceramic flower pot

By Ceramic Design



*Ceramic flower pot
*Color: green
*Size:13x13x12cm
*Made by rolling-press machine
*glazed inside and outside
-Name: set of ceramic flower pot(garden pot)(flower planter)
-Material: ceramics (fledspar,quartz,high quality clay)
-finishing glazed outside
-Size :( HxWxL,cm)
13x13x12cm
-PackingDetails
 packed in carton and shipped on wooden pallet
 carton size:55x28x15,8pcs/ctn,896pcs/pallet,8960pcs/20′FCL
-Delivery time
 30days for one 20′FCL

ceramics-flower-pot.jpg