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Mar

3

Crackled ceramic Vase

By Ceramic Design



Crackled ceramic Vase
small order accepted
different design available

Product Features

Crackled ceramic Vase

Size: 20*19CM, we can do other sizes according to your requests.

Material: fine clay & glaze

package:1pc per box, It is guaranteed to arrive in good working condition.

Product Description

Crackled ceramic Vase comes in Jingdezhen China.

It is a perfect home decorative vase.

Many other designs available, pls contact us to know more details.

Price:: FOB USD 1~2000 / Piece
Get Latest Price
Minimum Order Quantity:: Negotiable Trial Order
Minimum Order Quantity:: 1 Pair/PairsTrial Order
Port:: Shanghai
Packaging Details:: 1pc per box, It is guaranteed to arrive in good working condition.
Delivery Time:: according to order qty.
Payment Terms:: L/C,T/T,Western Union
Supply Ability:: 2000 Piece/Pieces per Month

Mar

3

gold engraved porcelain Vase

By Ceramic Design



gold engraved porcelain Vase

Size: 34*15.5CM, we can do other sizes according to your requests.

Material: fine clay & glaze

package:1pc per box, It is guaranteed to arrive in good working condition.

Product Description

gold engraved porcelain Vase
many new designs available
elegant Chinese style
Small order accepted

glossy glaze Also available as a lamp. Color options: silver, gold, yellow, celadon, crackle, grey, red etc.

Many other designs available, pls contact us to know more details.

Feb

21

Evolution of blue and white ware

By Ceramic Design



14th century

Further information: Jingdezhen ware

The true development of blue and white ware in China started with the first half of the 14th century, when it progressively replaced the century-long tradition of bluish-white ware, or Qingbai. The main production center was in Jingdezhen, Jiangxi Province.

15th century

With the advent of the Ming Dynasty in 1368, blue and white ware was shunned for a time by the Court, especially under the Hongwu and Yongle Emperors, as being too foreign in inspiration.Blue and white porcelain however came back to prominence with the Xuande Emperor, and again developed from that time on.

16th century

Some blue and white wares of the 16th century were characterized by Islamic influences, such as the ware under the Zhengde Emperor (1506–1521), which sometimes bore Persian and Arabic script.

17th century

During the 17th century, numerous blue and white pieces were made as export porcelain for the European markets. European symbols and scenes coexisted with Chinese scenes for these objects.

18th century

In the 18th century export porcelain continued to be produced for the European markets. As a result of the work of Francois Xavier d’Entrecolles however, an early example of “industrial spying” in which the details of Chinese porcelain manufacture were transmitted to Europe, Chinese exports of porcelain soon shrank considerably, especially by the end of the reign of the Qianlong Emperor.

Feb

18

14th century development Blue and white porcelain

By Ceramic Design



In the early 14th century mass-production of fine, translucent, blue and white porcelain started at Jingdezhen, sometimes called the porcelain capital of China. This development was due to the combination of Chinese techniques and Islamic trade. The new ware was made possible by the export of cobalt from Persia (called Huihui qing, 回回青, “Islamic blue”), combined with the translucent white quality of Chinese porcelain. Cobalt blue was considered as a precious commodity, with a value about twice that of gold.Motifs also draw inspiration from Islamic decorations. A large portion of these blue-and-white wares was then shipped to Southwest-Asian markets through the Muslim traders based in Guangzhou.

Chinese blue and white porcelain was once-fired: after the porcelain body was dried, decorated with refined cobalt-blue pigment mixed with water and applied using a brush, coated with a clear glaze and fired at high temperature. From the 16th century, local sources of cobalt blue started to be developed, although Persian cobalt remained the most expensive. Production of blue and white wares has continued at Jingdezhen to this day. Blue and white porcelain made at Jingdezhen probably reached the height of its technical excellence during the reign of the Kangxi emperor of the Qing Dynasty (reigned 1661 to 1722).

Feb

12

Blue and white wares

By Ceramic Design



Blue and white porcelain

Following in the tradition of earlier qingbai porcelains, blue and white wares are glazed using a transparent porcelain glaze. The blue decoration is painted onto the body of the porcelain before glazing, using very finely ground cobalt oxide mixed with water. After the decoration has been applied the pieces are glazed and fired.

It is believed that underglaze blue and white porcelain was first made in the Tang Dynasty. Only three complete pieces of Tang blue and white porcelain are known to exist (in Singapore from Indonesian Belitung shipwreck ), but shards dating to the 8th or 9th century have been unearthed at Yangzhou in the Jiangsu province. It has been suggested that the shards originated from a kiln in the province of Henan. In 1957, excavations at the site of a pagoda in the province Zhejiang uncovered a Northern Song bowl decorated with underglaze blue and further fragments have since been discovered at the same site. In 1970, a small fragment of a blue and white bowl, again dated to the 11th century, was also excavated in the province of Zhejiang.

In 1975, shards decorated with underglaze blue were excavated at a kiln site in Jiangxi and, in the same year, an underglaze blue and white urn was excavated from a tomb dated to 1319, in the province of Jiangsu. It is of interest to note that a Yuan funerary urn decorated with underglaze blue and underglaze red and dated 1338 is still in the Chinese taste, even though by this time the large-scale production of blue and white porcelain in the Yuan, Mongol taste had started its influence at Jingdezhen.

Starting early in the 14th century, blue and white porcelain rapidly became the main product of Jingdezhen, reaching the height of its technical excellence during the later years of the reign of the Kangxi Emperor and continuing in present times to be an important product of the city.

The tea caddy illustrated shows many of the characteristics of blue and white porcelain produced during the Kangxi period. The translucent body showing through the clear glaze is of great whiteness and the cobalt decoration, applied in many layers, has a fine blue hue. The decoration, a sage in a landscape of lakes and mountains with blazed rocks is typical of the period. The piece would have been fired in a saggar (a lidded ceramic box intended to protect the piece from kiln debris, smoke and cinders during firing) in a reducing atmosphere in a wood-burning egg-shaped kiln, at a temperature approaching 1350 °C.

Distinctive blue-and-white porcelain was exported to Japan where it is known as Tenkei blue-and-white ware or ko sometsukei. This ware is thought to have been especially ordered by tea masters for Japanese ceremony.

Feb

8

Qing Dynasty porcelain

By Ceramic Design



Primary source material on Qing Dynasty porcelain is available from both foreign residents and domestic authors. Two letters written by Père Francois Xavier d’Entrecolles, a Jesuit missionary and industrial spy who lived and worked in Jingdezhen in the early eighteenth century, described in detail manufacturing of porcelain in the city. In his first letter dated 1712, d’Entrecolles described the way in which pottery stones were crushed, refined and formed into little white bricks, known in Chinese as petuntse. He then went on to describe the refining of china clay kaolin along with the developmental stages of glazing and firing. He explained his motives:

Nothing but my curiosity could ever have prompted me to such researches, but it appears to me that a minute description of all that concerns this kind of work might, be useful in Europe.

In 1743, during the reign of the Qianlong Emperor, Tang Ying, the imperial supervisor in the city produced a memoir entitled “Twenty illustrations of the manufacture of porcelain.” Unfortunately, the original illustrations have been lost, but the text of the memoir is still accessible.

Feb

8

Ming dynasty ceramic vase

By Ceramic Design



Ming dynasty, 1368-1644

The Ming Dynasty saw an extraordinary period of innovation in ceramic manufacture. Kilns investigated new techniques in design and shapes, showing a predilection for colour and painted design, and an openness to foreign forms. The Yongle Emperor (1402–24) was especially curious about other countries (as evidenced by his support of the eunuch Zheng He’s extended exploration of the Indian Ocean), and enjoyed unusual shapes, many inspired by Islamic metalwork, During the Xuande reign (1425–35), a technical refinement was introduced in the preparation of the cobalt used for underglaze blue decoration. Prior to this the cobalt had been brilliant in colour, but with a tendency to bleed in firing; by adding a manganese the colour was duller, but the line crisper. Xuande porcelain is now considered among the finest of all Ming output. Enamelled decoration (such as the one at left) was perfected under the Chenghua Emperor (1464–87), and greatly prized by later collectors. Indeed by the late sixteenth century, Chenghua and Xuande era works – especially wine cups – had grown so much in popularity, that their prices nearly matched genuine antique wares of Song or even older. This esteem for relatively recent ceramics excited much scorn on the part of literati scholars (such as Wen Zhenheng, Tu Long, and Gao Lian, who is cited below); these men fancied themselves arbiters of taste and found the painted aesthetic ‘vulgar.’

In addition to these decorative innovations, the late Ming period underwent a dramatic shift towards a market economy,exporting porcelain around the world on an unprecedented scale. Thus aside from supplying porcelain for domestic use, the kilns at Jingdezhen became the main production centre for large-scale porcelain exports to Europe starting with the reign of the Wanli Emperor (1572–1620). By this time, kaolin and pottery stone were mixed in about equal proportions. Kaolin produced wares of great strength when added to the paste; it also enhanced the whiteness of the body – a trait that became a much sought after property, especially when form blue-and-white wares grew in popularity. Pottery stone could be fired at a lower temperature (1250 °C) than paste mixed with kaolin, which required 1350 °C. These sorts of variations were important to keep in mind because the large southern egg-shaped kiln varied greatly in temperature. Near the firebox it was hottest; near the chimney, at the opposite end of the kiln, it was cooler.

Jan

2

Ceramic Cup

By Ceramic Design



Drinkware Type: Mugs Material: Ceramic Ceramic Type: Clay
Certification: CE / EU Feature: Eco-Friendly Place of Origin: Jiangxi China (Mainland) Model Number: RYH140 Color: blue and white
Packaging & Delivery
Packaging Detail: 10pcs into a box or carton. all packing must be carefully
Delivery Detail: 15-45days

Specifications
Ceramic cup
High quality and reasonable price
With chinese characteristics
Small order accepted

Chinese Ceramic cup painted blue lotus inside. 100%hand made. Eco-friendly products.

Item no:RYH140
Dimensions: 3centimeters high * 7centimeters diameter
Condition: very good to excellent used-no chips or cracks.

Package: 10pcs into a box or carton. all packing must be carefully

Delivery time: 15-45days
FOB Shanghai

Jan

2

Beautiful Ceramic Fair Cup

By Ceramic Design



Drinkware Type: Mugs Material: Ceramic Ceramic Type: Clay
Certification: CE / EU Feature: Eco-Friendly Place of Origin: Jiangxi China (Mainland)
Model Number: RYR108 COLOR: blue and white
Packaging & Delivery
Packaging Detail: 10pcs into a box or carton. It must be packed carefully
Delivery Detail: 15-45days

Specifications
Cup for drinking tea, milk, coffee
Good quality and cheap price
It is a eco-friendly product
We accept small order

Features:

Item No: RYR108

Material: fine ceramics

Size: 4.5 centimeters high, 10 centimeters diameter.

Place of origin: Jingdezhen China

Package: 10pcs into a box or carton. It must be packed carefully.

Description:

Ceramic Fair Cup, handmade by experienced artist.It has fine painter and best workmanship.

Use fair cup to drink tea is a joy, it can ensure the tea with same aroma,same color and same concentration.

Dec

31

Jingdezhen Int’l Ceramics Fair charms visitors

By Ceramic Design



China Jingdezhen Int’l Ceramics Fair 2011 has opened in the porcelain harbor of Jingdezhen, in the Eastern China’s Jiangxi province.

China Jingdezhen Int’l Ceramics Fair 2011 has opened in the porcelain harbor of Jingdezhen, in the Eastern China’s Jiangxi province.