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Jul

7

Underglaze-red Vase with Carved Floral Design

By Ceramic Design Ideas



Underglaze-red Vase with Carved Floral Design

 

 

Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368)

This vessel is decorated with underglze-red motif and incised patterns. The red motif is bright but has blur outlines, reflecting the characteristics of underglaze-red wares in early Yuan dynasty.

Jun

1

Ju Ware Bowl in the Shape of a Lotus

By Ceramic Design



Ju Ware Bowl in the Shape of a Lotus – Northern Sung period (960-1126).

Height: 10.4 cm, diameter: 16.2 cm, diameter of base: 8.1 cm, depth: 7.6 cm, weight: 465 g

Ju Ware Bowl in the Shape of a Lotus

This ten-lobed lotus bowl has gently curved sides, a subtly flaring rim, smooth transition from one petal lobe to the next, and a relatively tall ring foot. The blue-green glaze, from rim to the base, is uniformly thin and opaque, with fine crackling. During firing, this piece was supported by five tiny points underneath the ring foot, and these are the only parts of the body not covered by the glaze. At these points, it is possible to make out the grayish-yellow unglazed ceramic body.

May

11

Blue-and-white Prunus Vase with Flowers and Fruits

By Ceramic Design



 Blue-and-white Prunus Vase with Flowers and Fruits

Blue-and-white Prunus Vase with Flowers and Fruits

Yongle reign (1403-1424), Ming dynasty (1368-1644)
Height: 35.5 cm
Mouth diameter: 6.5 cm
Foot diameter: 14 cm

Blue-and-white Prunus Vase with Flowers and Fruits 1

The vase has a small mouth with everted rim, a short neck, wide shoulders, a slightly tapered stomach and a lid with a small knob. The exterior is covered with blue-and-white glaze, decorated with S-shaped cloud design on the shoulder and disconnected sprays of floral ornamentation, fruit patterns on the stomach, slightly upward lotus-petal design and acanthus design around the foot. On the top of the lid is a plantain leaf design and a flower-leaf pattern on the walls of the lid.

Blue-and-white Prunus Vase with Flowers and Fruits 2
  The Chinese prunus vase was prevalent from the Song dynasty (960-1272) to the 18th century. The short neck and small mouth of this prunus vase recalls a thin balustrade. In early days, prunus vases were made with a conical lid, indicating that they were utilitarian liquid containers. However, ornament and arrangement later became their priority function instead of utility. This one is characterized by delicate ornamentation and clear composition, which is the typical style of the Yongle porcelain.

May

11

Prunus Vase with Sky-clearing-red Glaze

By Ceramic Design



Prunus Vase with Sky-clearing-red Glaze

Kangxi Reign (1662-1722), Qing Dynasty (1644-1911)
Height: 24.2 cm
Mouth diameter: 3.4 cm
Foot diameter: 7.8 cm

Covered with sky-clearing-red glaze, the vase has a small mouth, a short neck, wide shoulders, a slightly downward tapering body and a white nephrite-disk-shaped bottom, on which is written a blue-and-white seal in regular script with the date of manufacture: “Made in Kangxi period of Qing dynasty”. The seal has no borders. The regular-shaped and uniformly-glazed vase indicates that the high temperature copper-red porcelain, which failed to be handed down from the middle period of the Ming dynasty, was rejuvenated in the Jingdezhen imperial kiln during the Kangxi reign.
  The main kinds of high temperature copper-red glaze in the Kangxi period are sky-clearing red, lang-kiln red and kidney-bean red, each with a distinct identity. Characterized by uniform glaze and rich color, sky-clearing-red ware, besides serving as sacrificial vessels, were also used for implements in the scholar’s studio and for objects of daily use.

Mar

12

White-glazed Bowl, Ding Ware

By Ceramic Design



White-glazed-Bowl-Ding-Ware

With a copper-rimmed wide mouth, deep, bow-shaped belly and a ring foot, the bowl has an offwhite glaze. It has several glaze drips that look like tear stains.

Cao Zhao, a connoisseur of the Ming dynasty, remarked in his book on connoisseurship, Discussing Antiquities Case by Case (Ko Ku Yao Lun) “old Ding ware always has tear stains on the exterior, otherwise they are fake”. The tear stain is a natural phenomenon during firing of the porcelain. Transparent glazes melt at a high temperature and flow vertically because of gravity. They become a wax-tear or glass-bead bulge where the glaze mass, which makes them look like tear stains. These marks are one of the most typical characteristics of white-glazed Ding ware. Read more »

Mar

12

How to Choose Tile for Your Log Home

By Ceramic Design



For the better part of a year, my husband and I have been talking about tiling our kitchen. Our project has stalled because unlike paint, which can be changed on a whim, tile seems so much more permanent—and costly. Frankly, we’re afraid to take the plunge, because with all the tile design options out there, we don’t want to make the wrong decision.

And as Morwenna Brett, author of The Home Decorator’s Tile Bible, will tell you, the tile universe has opened wide, including everything from glass, metal, cork—even leather—to its tried-and-true ceramic and porcelain repertoire. But fear not—she has some tips for incorporating successful tile design in a log home. And thanks to her advice, I think we finally may be ready to dive in.

KEEP IT SIMPLE. Sometimes a natural, neutral tile color is the most beautiful option for a log home and will never look boring or outdated.

MINIMIZE MIXING. According to Morwenna, when creating tile combinations (glazed ceramic with glass, tumbled stone with metallics), less is definitely more. Two distinct types of tile are enough to create interest. Don’t be tempted to mix three or more different materials—the result could look messy.

CONSIDER THE IMPACT OF PATTERNS. In Morwenna’s opinion, just about any tile pattern (see sidebar, right) is log home appropriate. Some designs, like “basket weave” and “pinwheel” impart country flair. Others, like “octagon with dot,” can feel more retro. Combining patterns gives you more of an informal feeling than using a single pattern will. Or think about using some of the new materials, like metallic inserts, hand-painted accent tiles or leather squares in lieu of patterns to add interest.

Read more »

Mar

12

Types of Decorative Tiles Flooring designs

By Ceramic Design



One of the fastest growing trends in the flooring, tiles come in various designs, sizes and materials. Numerous brands available in the market make the choice even more complicated.  In this article we will discuss some of the guidelines one should keep in mind before going ahead with the tile flooring.

Types of Decorative Tiles are

Unglazed Tiles

Unglazed tiles are made up of baking clay. Basic color of tiles is orange-red. Now, with the help of upgrade techniques tiles are coming up in more colors but color range is limited from chocolate to ochre. Motted looked tiles are also available in the market.

In unglazed tiles both handmade and machine made with wide range in texture are available. Machine made are harder and durable.

 

Glazed Tiles

Glazed tiles are smoother and have more shine than of unglazed ones. Wide color range with different motifs are now available in market with which one can go for interesting patterns.
Glazed tiles are thin with surface texture range from high gloss to mat and pebbly. Even tiles with rough texture gets prone to slickness when exposed to water, that is why glazed tiles are not preferred to external surfaces.

  heath_tile_boards-007110-2

Mosaic Tiles

Mosaic tiles are right choice for modernizing your house. The mosaic tiles are durable and are available in different designs and shapes. For those who are looking for variety in color, texture and designs, mosaic tile is a good choice for them. Read more »

Jan

8

Ceramic Tiles

By Ceramic Design



Ceramic tiles have gradually developed through whole flooring industry. These tiles are extensively used as flooring material nowadays. These have certain excellent properties given below.

Ceramic-Tiles

•Strength:
Ceramic floors are extremely strong. They have a breaking strength of about 350-400 kg/cm2.
•Stain free:
Ceramic floors are easiest to clean. They are stain free. They are acid and alkali resistant.
•Scratch resistance:
These tiles have a very high scratch resistance and their hardness is about 6-7 on Moh’s scale (A measure of a mineral hardness and its resistance to scratching).
•Light weight:
Ceramic floors are just 7.5mm thick. This requires a thinner floor sheet than that of mosaic/marble flooring. Read more »

Mar

3

Crackled ceramic Vase

By Ceramic Design



Crackled ceramic Vase
small order accepted
different design available

Product Features

Crackled ceramic Vase

Size: 20*19CM, we can do other sizes according to your requests.

Material: fine clay & glaze

package:1pc per box, It is guaranteed to arrive in good working condition.

Product Description

Crackled ceramic Vase comes in Jingdezhen China.

It is a perfect home decorative vase.

Many other designs available, pls contact us to know more details.

Price:: FOB USD 1~2000 / Piece
Get Latest Price
Minimum Order Quantity:: Negotiable Trial Order
Minimum Order Quantity:: 1 Pair/PairsTrial Order
Port:: Shanghai
Packaging Details:: 1pc per box, It is guaranteed to arrive in good working condition.
Delivery Time:: according to order qty.
Payment Terms:: L/C,T/T,Western Union
Supply Ability:: 2000 Piece/Pieces per Month

Feb

26

Joseon Dynasty porcelain

By Ceramic Design



Joseon white porcelain and Buncheong

During the Joseon Dynasty, (1392–1910) ceramic ware was considered to represent the highest quality of achievement from imperial, city, and provincial kilns, the last of which were export-driven wares. This was the golden age of Korean pottery, with a long period of growth in imperial and provincial kilns, and much work of the highest quality still preserved.

Wares evolved along Chinese lines in terms of colour, shape, and technique. Celadon, white porcelain, and storage pottery were similar, but with slight variations in glazes, incision designs, florality, and weight. The Ming influence in blue and white wares using cobalt-blue glazes existed, but without the pthalo blue range, and the three-dimensional glassine colour depth of Ming Dynasty Chinese works.

Simplified designs emerged early on. Buddhist designs still prevailed in celadon wares: lotus flowers, and willow trees. The form most often seen was that of pear-shaped bottles. Notable were thinner glazes, and colourless glazes for buncheong or stoneware.
After the prolonged fall of the Ming dynasty, immigration of some Chinese master potters occurred in southern coastal Korea. Qing colouring, brighter and almost Scythian in enamel imitation, was rejected by Korean potters, in favour of simpler, less decorated wares in keeping with a new dynasty that built itself on military tradition.

Generally, the ceramics of this dynasty is divided into early, middle, and late periods, changing every two centuries, approximately; thus 1300 to 1500 is the early period, 1500 to 1700 the middle, and 1700 to 1900–1910 the late period.

The wares began to assume more traditional Korean glazes and more specific designs to meet regional needs. This is to be expected, as the Scythian art influences were of the former dynasty. The rise of white porcelain occurred as a result of Confucian influence and ideals, resulting in purer, less pretentious forms lacking artifice and complexity.

In 1592 during the Japanese invasion of Korea, entire villages of Korean potters were forcibly relocated to Japan permanently damaging the pottery industry as craftsmen had to relearn techniques because the masters were gone.