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Mar

22

Blue-and-white Flask with Ruyi-scepter Shaped Ears and Interlocking Lotus Design

By Ceramic Design Ideas



 

 

Blue-and-white Flask with Ruyi-scepter Shaped Ears and Interlocking Lotus Design

Qianlong Reign (1736-1795), Qing Dynasty (1644-1911)

This pot has a garlic-head shaped mouth and a pair of ruyi-shaped ears. The interior is glazed white while the exterior is painted with floral designs. This vessel was made for court use during the Qianlong era (1736-1795) at Jingdezhen imperial kiln. This flask reflects the popularity of antique style at that time.

May

11

Blue-and-white Prunus Vase with Flowers and Fruits

By Ceramic Design



 Blue-and-white Prunus Vase with Flowers and Fruits

Blue-and-white Prunus Vase with Flowers and Fruits

Yongle reign (1403-1424), Ming dynasty (1368-1644)
Height: 35.5 cm
Mouth diameter: 6.5 cm
Foot diameter: 14 cm

Blue-and-white Prunus Vase with Flowers and Fruits 1

The vase has a small mouth with everted rim, a short neck, wide shoulders, a slightly tapered stomach and a lid with a small knob. The exterior is covered with blue-and-white glaze, decorated with S-shaped cloud design on the shoulder and disconnected sprays of floral ornamentation, fruit patterns on the stomach, slightly upward lotus-petal design and acanthus design around the foot. On the top of the lid is a plantain leaf design and a flower-leaf pattern on the walls of the lid.

Blue-and-white Prunus Vase with Flowers and Fruits 2
  The Chinese prunus vase was prevalent from the Song dynasty (960-1272) to the 18th century. The short neck and small mouth of this prunus vase recalls a thin balustrade. In early days, prunus vases were made with a conical lid, indicating that they were utilitarian liquid containers. However, ornament and arrangement later became their priority function instead of utility. This one is characterized by delicate ornamentation and clear composition, which is the typical style of the Yongle porcelain.

May

11

Crimson Porcelain Bowl

By Ceramic Design



Crimson-Porcelain-Bowl

Crimson Porcelain Bowl

Xuande reign (1426-1435), Ming dynasty
Height: 8 cm
Mouth diameter: 18.9 cm
Foot diameter: 8 cm
Court collection

The red-glazed bowl has a flared-mouth, a swelling body and a foot ring. On the greenish-white glazed foot ring is printed a seal in blue-and-white with the date of manufacture written in regular script that translates, “Made in Xuande period of Ming dynasty”. The seal is enclosed with blue-and-white double borders.
  Red glazed ware technique flourished during Xuande reign in the Ming dynasty. Compared with red-glazed porcelain ware in Yongle period (1403-1424), those produced during the Xuande period enjoyed a significant increase in total number and have greater variety in glazes, such as ruby red, sacrificial red, sky-clearing red, and sang-de-bœuf. The red glaze in the Xuande period is rich and striking with a slight exposure of white on the edge which is pleasure to observe. Besides bowls, plates and high-footed bowls, more shapes were commonly seen, such as washers, incense burners, prunus vases, monk’s cap jugs, sauce-pots and pear-shaped pots. The porcelain ware is ornamented with incised designs and golden tracery. The rim of the mouth is left white, which is popularly called “Juncus effusus mouth”. Fired on its foot, the red-glazed bowl is darker bluish green where the glaze masses and bubbles are most dense at the thickest part. Typical features of Xuande red glaze are rich color, no signs of flow or of the glaze peeling off. After the Xuande period, the red glaze ware declined. It was not rejuvenated until the Kangxi reign (1662-1722) of the Qing dynasty.

Mar

3

Crackled ceramic Vase

By Ceramic Design



Crackled ceramic Vase
small order accepted
different design available

Product Features

Crackled ceramic Vase

Size: 20*19CM, we can do other sizes according to your requests.

Material: fine clay & glaze

package:1pc per box, It is guaranteed to arrive in good working condition.

Product Description

Crackled ceramic Vase comes in Jingdezhen China.

It is a perfect home decorative vase.

Many other designs available, pls contact us to know more details.

Price:: FOB USD 1~2000 / Piece
Get Latest Price
Minimum Order Quantity:: Negotiable Trial Order
Minimum Order Quantity:: 1 Pair/PairsTrial Order
Port:: Shanghai
Packaging Details:: 1pc per box, It is guaranteed to arrive in good working condition.
Delivery Time:: according to order qty.
Payment Terms:: L/C,T/T,Western Union
Supply Ability:: 2000 Piece/Pieces per Month

Feb

26

Korean pottery and porcelain

By Ceramic Design



The Three Kingdoms of Korea (57 BC-668 AD), namely Silla, Goguryeo, and Baekje, provided the beginning of Korean ceramic history. Rough domestic wares for the people were produced from numerous kilns. Likewise a number of very sophisticated statues of royal figures, guardians, and horses, equivalent to Chinese Han Dynasty figures, used for domestic and imperial votive shrines, as well as for escorts of the dead in tombs of the nobles and kings, were turned on potter’s wheels, while others were formed using the traditional hammered clay and coil method.

During the Unified Silla period (668–935) pottery was simple in colour, shape, and design. Celadon was subsequently the main production, with baekja porcelain wares developing slowly in the 14th century, when the pace accelerated with new glazes, better clays, and surprising variations of the white of different clays.

The kilns at the time had to compete with Chinese wares on a variety of social levels. The Korean ceramic masters decided to distinguish Korean baekja or white porcelain from Chinese imports by maintaining simplicity in design when the practical problems of finding pure white glazes were solved. Dating of glazes from this era has revealed a celadon or jade patina beneath white glazes.

Baekja wares came from highly refined white clay, glazed with feldspar, and fired in large carefully regulated and very clean kilns. Despite the refining process, glazes in white colours always vary as a result of the properties of the clay itself; firing methods were not uniform, temperatures varied and glazes on pieces vary from pure white, in an almost snowy thickness, through milky white that shows the clay beneath deliberately in washed glaze, to light blue and light yellow patinas.

The baekja wares reached their zenith immediately before the Joseon Dynasty came to power. Fine pieces have recently been found in the area about Wolchil Peak in the Diamond Mountains. The transitional wares of white became expressions of the Joseon Dynasty celebrations of victory in many pieces decorated with Korean calligraphy. Traditionally white wares were used by both the scholarly Confucian class, the nobility, and royalty on more formal occasions.

Simultaneously, the Buddhist traditions demanded celadon-glazed wares, and cheongja pieces of celadon porcelain with more organic shapes drawing on gourds, with animal and bird motifs that evolved very quickly. In some ways these were over-decorated wares, using exaggerated forms, stylized repeating designs, and a wide variety of organic patterns.

Cheongja wares used refined earth clays with a bit of iron powder added, then a glaze with a bit of added iron powder added once again, then fired. The glaze dried to a hard finish and was durable with a slightly shinier and glossier finish, in an oily way, than whitewares.

Feb

21

Influences – Blue and white porcelain

By Ceramic Design



Influences on Islamic pottery

Further information: Chinese influences on Islamic pottery and İznik pottery

Chinese blue and white ware became extremely popular in the Middle-East from the 14th century, where both Chinese and Islamic types coexisted.

From the 13th century, Chinese pictorial designs, such as flying cranes, dragons and lotus flowers also started to appear in the ceramic productions of the Near-East, especially in Syria and Egypt.

Chinese porcelain of the 14th or 15th century was transmitted to the Middle-East and the Near East, and especially to the Ottoman Empire either through gifts or through war booty. Chinese designs were extremely influential with the pottery manufacturers at Iznik, Turkey. The Ming “grape” design in particular was highly popular and was extensively reproduced under the Ottoman Empire.

Influences on European porcelains

Early influences

Chinese blue-and-white ware were copied in Europe from the 16th century, with the faience blue-and-white technique called alla porcelana. Soon after the first experiments to reproduce the material of Chinese blue-and-white porcelain were made with Medici porcelain. These early works seem to be mixing influences from Islamic as well as Chinese blue-and-white wares.

Direct Chinese imitations

By the beginning of the 17th century Chinese blue and white porcelain was being exported directly to Europe. In the 17th and 18th centuries, Oriental blue and white porcelain was highly prized in Europe and America and sometimes enhanced by fine silver and gold mounts, it was collected by kings and princes.

The European manufacture of porcelain started at Meissen in Germany in 1707. The detailed secrets of Chinese hard-paste porcelain technique were transmitted to Europe through the efforts of the Jesuit Father Francois Xavier d’Entrecolles between 1712 and 1722.

The early wares were strongly influenced by Chinese and other Oriental porcelains and an early pattern was blue onion, which is still in production at the Meissen factory today. The first phase of the French porcelain was also strongly influenced by Chinese designs. Early English porcelain wares were also influenced by Chinese wares and when, for example, the production of porcelain started at Worcester, nearly forty years after Meissen, Oriental blue and white wares provided the inspiration for much of the decoration used. Hand-painted and transfer-printed wares were made at Worcester and at other early English factories in a style known as Chinoiserie. Many other European factories followed this trend. In Delft, Netherlands blue and white ceramics taking their designs from Chinese export porcelains made for the Dutch market were made in large numbers throughout the 17th Century. Blue and white Delftware was itself extensively copied by factories in other European countries, including England, where it is known as English Delftware.

Patterns

The plate shown in the illustration (left) is decorated with the famous willow pattern and was probably made at a factory in the English county of Staffordshire. Such is the persistence of the willow pattern that it is difficult to date the piece shown with any precision; it is possibly quite recent but similar wares have been produced by English factories in huge numbers over long periods and are still being made today. The willow pattern, said to tell the sad story of a pair of star-crossed lovers, was an entirely European design, though one that was strongly influenced in style by design features borrowed from Chinese export porcelains of the 18th Century. The willow pattern was, in turn, copied by Chinese potters, but with the decoration hand painted rather than transfer-printed.

Feb

21

Evolution of blue and white ware

By Ceramic Design



14th century

Further information: Jingdezhen ware

The true development of blue and white ware in China started with the first half of the 14th century, when it progressively replaced the century-long tradition of bluish-white ware, or Qingbai. The main production center was in Jingdezhen, Jiangxi Province.

15th century

With the advent of the Ming Dynasty in 1368, blue and white ware was shunned for a time by the Court, especially under the Hongwu and Yongle Emperors, as being too foreign in inspiration.Blue and white porcelain however came back to prominence with the Xuande Emperor, and again developed from that time on.

16th century

Some blue and white wares of the 16th century were characterized by Islamic influences, such as the ware under the Zhengde Emperor (1506–1521), which sometimes bore Persian and Arabic script.

17th century

During the 17th century, numerous blue and white pieces were made as export porcelain for the European markets. European symbols and scenes coexisted with Chinese scenes for these objects.

18th century

In the 18th century export porcelain continued to be produced for the European markets. As a result of the work of Francois Xavier d’Entrecolles however, an early example of “industrial spying” in which the details of Chinese porcelain manufacture were transmitted to Europe, Chinese exports of porcelain soon shrank considerably, especially by the end of the reign of the Qianlong Emperor.

Feb

18

14th century development Blue and white porcelain

By Ceramic Design



In the early 14th century mass-production of fine, translucent, blue and white porcelain started at Jingdezhen, sometimes called the porcelain capital of China. This development was due to the combination of Chinese techniques and Islamic trade. The new ware was made possible by the export of cobalt from Persia (called Huihui qing, 回回青, “Islamic blue”), combined with the translucent white quality of Chinese porcelain. Cobalt blue was considered as a precious commodity, with a value about twice that of gold.Motifs also draw inspiration from Islamic decorations. A large portion of these blue-and-white wares was then shipped to Southwest-Asian markets through the Muslim traders based in Guangzhou.

Chinese blue and white porcelain was once-fired: after the porcelain body was dried, decorated with refined cobalt-blue pigment mixed with water and applied using a brush, coated with a clear glaze and fired at high temperature. From the 16th century, local sources of cobalt blue started to be developed, although Persian cobalt remained the most expensive. Production of blue and white wares has continued at Jingdezhen to this day. Blue and white porcelain made at Jingdezhen probably reached the height of its technical excellence during the reign of the Kangxi emperor of the Qing Dynasty (reigned 1661 to 1722).

Feb

18

Tang and Song blue-and-white

By Ceramic Design



The first Chinese blue and white wares were as early as the ninth century in Henan province, China; although only shards have been discovered. Tang period blue-and-white is even rarer than Song blue-and-white and was unknown before 1985. The Tang pieces are not porcelain however, but rather earthenwares with greenish white slip, using cobalt blue pigments which probably originated in the Middle-East.The only three pieces of complete “Tang blue and white” in the world were recovered from Indonesian Belitung shipwreck in 1998 and later sold to Singapore.

Feb

14

Later trade of Chinese export porcelain

By Ceramic Design



As trade developed, finer quality wares were shipped by private traders who rented space on the Dutch East India Company ships. The bulk export wares of the 18th century were typically teawares and dinner services, often Blue and white decorated with flowers, pine, prunus, bamboo or with pagoda landscapes, a style that inspired the Willow pattern. They were sometimes clobbered (enamelled) in the Netherlands and England to enhance their decorative appeal. By the late 18th century, imports from China were in decline. Tastes were changing and competition from new European factories with mass-production brought about industrialisation took its toll.

Highly decorative Canton porcelain was produced throughout the 19th century but the quality of wares was in decline. By the end of the century, Blue and white wares in the Kangxi style were produced in large quantities and almost every earlier style and type was copied into the 20th century.