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Jan

20

Large Vase with Poem and Floral Design in Gold and Famille-rose enamels on Sky-clearing-blue Ground

By Ceramic Design Ideas



 

Large Vase with Poem and Floral Design in Gold and Famille-rose enamels on Sky-clearing-blue Ground

Qianlong Reign (1736-1795), Qing Dynasty (1644-1911)

While the mouth and neck portions of the vase are glazed in sky-clearing-blue and decorated with a familie rose gold pattern, the stomach is decorated with three groups of floral branches that alternate with verses by the Qianlong Emperor.

Jul

4

Covered Sky-blue Prunus Vase

By Ceramic Design Ideas



Covered Sky-blue Prunus Vase

 

Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368)

Jun kiln site ais located int Yuzhou city, Henan province This vase bears purple-red spots on its moon-white glaze, like clouds floating in the sky. The craftsman did it randomly but somehow achieved a very artistic style. Originally used as a wine container, the prunus vase was designed with a cover. However, as time went by, most of those vases lost their covers. Among the very few surviving prunus vases from the Jun kiln, this one with its cover intact is very precious.

Jun

30

Tricolor Pottery Figurine of a Military Officer

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Tricolor Pottery Figurine of a Military Officer

Tang dynasty (618-907)

In a he bird hat with a dignified facial expression, this military officer has a high nose bridge, deep eyes, and handlebar-shaped moustache. According to ancient records, he was a bellicose bird. In the Tang dynasty, the he-bird decorating the hat was usually designed like a little sparrow that unfolded its wings with head downward. This piece was donated by Mr. Zheng Zhenduo (1898-1958).

Jun

26

Black Pottery Pot with Double Rings

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Black Pottery Pot with Double Rings

Longshan Culture (ca. 2400-2000 BCE), Neolithic Era (ca. 10000- ca. 2000 BCE)

The black pottery was fired in a strongly reducing atmosphere (lacking oxygen); during the last stage of firing the fire was extinguished, the kiln was closed, and water was poured from the top chimney; carbon element from the fuel infiltrated the ceramic wall through the steam. Longshan is a Late Neolithic culture. It was named after Longshan village, Zhangqiu county, Shandong province where it was first recognized in 1928. The vessel was made on a rotating wheel which became common during the Longshan culture, and vessels became thinner than before

Jun

26

Celadon Cong Vase, Longquan Ware

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Celadon Cong Vase

Southern Song Dynasty (1127-1279)

Longquan kiln is located in Longquan, Zhejiang province The Song dynasty saw the trend of restoring ancient styles in porcelain production. Derived from the jade cong tube of ancient times with minor changes, the oldest surviving cong vase dates to the Southern Song dynasty. The Shiwan kiln of the Ming dynasty (1368-1644) and Jingdezhen of the Qing dynasty (1644-1911) also produced such vases, but neither of them could emulate the elegance of the Longquan cong vases of the Song dynasty

May

11

Crimson Porcelain Bowl

By Ceramic Design



Crimson-Porcelain-Bowl

Crimson Porcelain Bowl

Xuande reign (1426-1435), Ming dynasty
Height: 8 cm
Mouth diameter: 18.9 cm
Foot diameter: 8 cm
Court collection

The red-glazed bowl has a flared-mouth, a swelling body and a foot ring. On the greenish-white glazed foot ring is printed a seal in blue-and-white with the date of manufacture written in regular script that translates, “Made in Xuande period of Ming dynasty”. The seal is enclosed with blue-and-white double borders.
  Red glazed ware technique flourished during Xuande reign in the Ming dynasty. Compared with red-glazed porcelain ware in Yongle period (1403-1424), those produced during the Xuande period enjoyed a significant increase in total number and have greater variety in glazes, such as ruby red, sacrificial red, sky-clearing red, and sang-de-bœuf. The red glaze in the Xuande period is rich and striking with a slight exposure of white on the edge which is pleasure to observe. Besides bowls, plates and high-footed bowls, more shapes were commonly seen, such as washers, incense burners, prunus vases, monk’s cap jugs, sauce-pots and pear-shaped pots. The porcelain ware is ornamented with incised designs and golden tracery. The rim of the mouth is left white, which is popularly called “Juncus effusus mouth”. Fired on its foot, the red-glazed bowl is darker bluish green where the glaze masses and bubbles are most dense at the thickest part. Typical features of Xuande red glaze are rich color, no signs of flow or of the glaze peeling off. After the Xuande period, the red glaze ware declined. It was not rejuvenated until the Kangxi reign (1662-1722) of the Qing dynasty.

May

11

Prunus Vase with Sky-clearing-red Glaze

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Prunus Vase with Sky-clearing-red Glaze

Kangxi Reign (1662-1722), Qing Dynasty (1644-1911)
Height: 24.2 cm
Mouth diameter: 3.4 cm
Foot diameter: 7.8 cm

Covered with sky-clearing-red glaze, the vase has a small mouth, a short neck, wide shoulders, a slightly downward tapering body and a white nephrite-disk-shaped bottom, on which is written a blue-and-white seal in regular script with the date of manufacture: “Made in Kangxi period of Qing dynasty”. The seal has no borders. The regular-shaped and uniformly-glazed vase indicates that the high temperature copper-red porcelain, which failed to be handed down from the middle period of the Ming dynasty, was rejuvenated in the Jingdezhen imperial kiln during the Kangxi reign.
  The main kinds of high temperature copper-red glaze in the Kangxi period are sky-clearing red, lang-kiln red and kidney-bean red, each with a distinct identity. Characterized by uniform glaze and rich color, sky-clearing-red ware, besides serving as sacrificial vessels, were also used for implements in the scholar’s studio and for objects of daily use.

Mar

12

Ceramics throughout the Past Dynasties in the Collection of the Palace Museum

By Ceramic Design



A total of 429 ceramic objects, representing a comprehensive history of the development of Chinese ceramics, comprise this permanent exhibition. The new exhibition incorporates the newest advancements in ancient ceramics research. Housed in an expanded exhibition space, the new exhibition utilizes electronic technology to better educate and interact with viewers. Optimal lighting allows viewers to see the objects more clearly. A specially designed electronic exhibition area, which includes educational films, touch screens and interactive games provide a fun learning experience for children and adults. Moreover, electronic touch screens located throughout the exhibition allow viewers to learn more about the displayed works.
Ceramics throughout the Past Dynasties in the Collection of the Palace Museum

Visiting Information 
Opening times
Ticket sold:8:30—15:30
Openning Hours:8:30—16:30
Last Entry:15:40
Admission:Ticket: 40 rmb/person
           Treasure Gallery: 10 rmb/person
           Clock Gallery: 10 rmb/person
           Children under 120 cm in height are free of charge

Jan

8

Pearl River Rice Bowls

By Ceramic Design



Pearl River Rice Bowls Set, Cabin Decor Ideas, Clare’s Wares

pearl-river-ceramic-bowls

Pearl River Ceramic Bowls
If you’re ever in New York City, don’t miss the chance to stop by this massive store in Chinatown (billed as “the first Chinese-American department store” when it opened 30 years ago) for the chance to peruse a bevy of authentic Chinese goods, from silky satin slippers to beautiful lacquered bowls. If you can’t make it to New York, don’t worry—the store now sells a great selection of its wares online.

Feb

21

Influences – Blue and white porcelain

By Ceramic Design



Influences on Islamic pottery

Further information: Chinese influences on Islamic pottery and İznik pottery

Chinese blue and white ware became extremely popular in the Middle-East from the 14th century, where both Chinese and Islamic types coexisted.

From the 13th century, Chinese pictorial designs, such as flying cranes, dragons and lotus flowers also started to appear in the ceramic productions of the Near-East, especially in Syria and Egypt.

Chinese porcelain of the 14th or 15th century was transmitted to the Middle-East and the Near East, and especially to the Ottoman Empire either through gifts or through war booty. Chinese designs were extremely influential with the pottery manufacturers at Iznik, Turkey. The Ming “grape” design in particular was highly popular and was extensively reproduced under the Ottoman Empire.

Influences on European porcelains

Early influences

Chinese blue-and-white ware were copied in Europe from the 16th century, with the faience blue-and-white technique called alla porcelana. Soon after the first experiments to reproduce the material of Chinese blue-and-white porcelain were made with Medici porcelain. These early works seem to be mixing influences from Islamic as well as Chinese blue-and-white wares.

Direct Chinese imitations

By the beginning of the 17th century Chinese blue and white porcelain was being exported directly to Europe. In the 17th and 18th centuries, Oriental blue and white porcelain was highly prized in Europe and America and sometimes enhanced by fine silver and gold mounts, it was collected by kings and princes.

The European manufacture of porcelain started at Meissen in Germany in 1707. The detailed secrets of Chinese hard-paste porcelain technique were transmitted to Europe through the efforts of the Jesuit Father Francois Xavier d’Entrecolles between 1712 and 1722.

The early wares were strongly influenced by Chinese and other Oriental porcelains and an early pattern was blue onion, which is still in production at the Meissen factory today. The first phase of the French porcelain was also strongly influenced by Chinese designs. Early English porcelain wares were also influenced by Chinese wares and when, for example, the production of porcelain started at Worcester, nearly forty years after Meissen, Oriental blue and white wares provided the inspiration for much of the decoration used. Hand-painted and transfer-printed wares were made at Worcester and at other early English factories in a style known as Chinoiserie. Many other European factories followed this trend. In Delft, Netherlands blue and white ceramics taking their designs from Chinese export porcelains made for the Dutch market were made in large numbers throughout the 17th Century. Blue and white Delftware was itself extensively copied by factories in other European countries, including England, where it is known as English Delftware.

Patterns

The plate shown in the illustration (left) is decorated with the famous willow pattern and was probably made at a factory in the English county of Staffordshire. Such is the persistence of the willow pattern that it is difficult to date the piece shown with any precision; it is possibly quite recent but similar wares have been produced by English factories in huge numbers over long periods and are still being made today. The willow pattern, said to tell the sad story of a pair of star-crossed lovers, was an entirely European design, though one that was strongly influenced in style by design features borrowed from Chinese export porcelains of the 18th Century. The willow pattern was, in turn, copied by Chinese potters, but with the decoration hand painted rather than transfer-printed.