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Jul

7

Blue-and-white Jar with Designs of Interlocking Peony and Dragon among Clouds

By Ceramic Design Ideas



Blue-and-white Jar

 

 

Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368)

The jar is decorated with five cobalt blue patterns from the mouth rim to the bottom. The most notable one is the central design featuring dragons among clouds. Typical of the Yuan dynasty, the dragon has a small head, thin neck, long body and three-claw paw, looking ferocious.

Jul

7

Underglaze-red Vase with Carved Floral Design

By Ceramic Design Ideas



Underglaze-red Vase with Carved Floral Design

 

 

Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368)

This vessel is decorated with underglze-red motif and incised patterns. The red motif is bright but has blur outlines, reflecting the characteristics of underglaze-red wares in early Yuan dynasty.

Jul

1

Polychrome Beaker Vase with Design of Peony and Magnolia

By Ceramic Design Ideas



Polychrome Beaker Vase

Shunzhi Reign (1644-1661), Qing Dynasty (1644-1911)

In the Qing dynasty Shunzhi era, polychrome porcelain shapes retained the antique flavor of late Ming dynasty. Many vessels employed a strong contrast between vivid hues of vermillion and green boldly painted in unrestrained fashion. The body of this beaker vase (gu) has white glaze with blue-green specks, polychrome-painted with distinct images of irregular rocks, flowers, and other designs. Each color is vibrant, with visual effects presented clearly with a refined sense of beauty.

Jun

30

Red Pottery Pot

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Red Pottery Pot

Cishan Culture (ca. 6000-5600 BCE), Neolithic Era (ca. 10000- ca. 2000 BCE)

A yu is a vessel for serving grain or soup. Because the sand-tempered red ceramic provides increased heat resistance, this red yu was probably a cooking vessel. The Cishan culture is named after the village of Cishan, in Wu’an county, Hebei province, where the first finds of this type were made in 1972. It dates to the Northern China Middle Neolithic, 6000-5600 BC.

Jun

30

Tricolor Pottery Figurine of a Military Officer

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Tricolor Pottery Figurine of a Military Officer

Tang dynasty (618-907)

In a he bird hat with a dignified facial expression, this military officer has a high nose bridge, deep eyes, and handlebar-shaped moustache. According to ancient records, he was a bellicose bird. In the Tang dynasty, the he-bird decorating the hat was usually designed like a little sparrow that unfolded its wings with head downward. This piece was donated by Mr. Zheng Zhenduo (1898-1958).

Jun

26

Red Pottery Bowl with Flat Bottom

By Ceramic Design Ideas



Red Pottery Bowl with Flat Bottom

Cishan Culture (ca. 6000-5600 BCE), Neolithic Era (ca. 10000- ca. 2000 BCE)

Pottery of the Cishan culture is dominated by red pottery, and the bowl is one of the most common forms. The Cishan culture is named after the village of Cishan, in Wu’an county, Hebei province, where the first finds of this type were made in 1972. It dates to the Northern China Middle Neolithic, 6000-5600 BC.

Mar

12

White-glazed Bowl, Ding Ware

By Ceramic Design



White-glazed-Bowl-Ding-Ware

With a copper-rimmed wide mouth, deep, bow-shaped belly and a ring foot, the bowl has an offwhite glaze. It has several glaze drips that look like tear stains.

Cao Zhao, a connoisseur of the Ming dynasty, remarked in his book on connoisseurship, Discussing Antiquities Case by Case (Ko Ku Yao Lun) “old Ding ware always has tear stains on the exterior, otherwise they are fake”. The tear stain is a natural phenomenon during firing of the porcelain. Transparent glazes melt at a high temperature and flow vertically because of gravity. They become a wax-tear or glass-bead bulge where the glaze mass, which makes them look like tear stains. These marks are one of the most typical characteristics of white-glazed Ding ware. Read more »

Mar

12

Ceramics throughout the Past Dynasties in the Collection of the Palace Museum

By Ceramic Design



A total of 429 ceramic objects, representing a comprehensive history of the development of Chinese ceramics, comprise this permanent exhibition. The new exhibition incorporates the newest advancements in ancient ceramics research. Housed in an expanded exhibition space, the new exhibition utilizes electronic technology to better educate and interact with viewers. Optimal lighting allows viewers to see the objects more clearly. A specially designed electronic exhibition area, which includes educational films, touch screens and interactive games provide a fun learning experience for children and adults. Moreover, electronic touch screens located throughout the exhibition allow viewers to learn more about the displayed works.
Ceramics throughout the Past Dynasties in the Collection of the Palace Museum

Visiting Information 
Opening times
Ticket sold:8:30—15:30
Openning Hours:8:30—16:30
Last Entry:15:40
Admission:Ticket: 40 rmb/person
           Treasure Gallery: 10 rmb/person
           Clock Gallery: 10 rmb/person
           Children under 120 cm in height are free of charge

Feb

26

Joseon Dynasty porcelain

By Ceramic Design



Joseon white porcelain and Buncheong

During the Joseon Dynasty, (1392–1910) ceramic ware was considered to represent the highest quality of achievement from imperial, city, and provincial kilns, the last of which were export-driven wares. This was the golden age of Korean pottery, with a long period of growth in imperial and provincial kilns, and much work of the highest quality still preserved.

Wares evolved along Chinese lines in terms of colour, shape, and technique. Celadon, white porcelain, and storage pottery were similar, but with slight variations in glazes, incision designs, florality, and weight. The Ming influence in blue and white wares using cobalt-blue glazes existed, but without the pthalo blue range, and the three-dimensional glassine colour depth of Ming Dynasty Chinese works.

Simplified designs emerged early on. Buddhist designs still prevailed in celadon wares: lotus flowers, and willow trees. The form most often seen was that of pear-shaped bottles. Notable were thinner glazes, and colourless glazes for buncheong or stoneware.
After the prolonged fall of the Ming dynasty, immigration of some Chinese master potters occurred in southern coastal Korea. Qing colouring, brighter and almost Scythian in enamel imitation, was rejected by Korean potters, in favour of simpler, less decorated wares in keeping with a new dynasty that built itself on military tradition.

Generally, the ceramics of this dynasty is divided into early, middle, and late periods, changing every two centuries, approximately; thus 1300 to 1500 is the early period, 1500 to 1700 the middle, and 1700 to 1900–1910 the late period.

The wares began to assume more traditional Korean glazes and more specific designs to meet regional needs. This is to be expected, as the Scythian art influences were of the former dynasty. The rise of white porcelain occurred as a result of Confucian influence and ideals, resulting in purer, less pretentious forms lacking artifice and complexity.

In 1592 during the Japanese invasion of Korea, entire villages of Korean potters were forcibly relocated to Japan permanently damaging the pottery industry as craftsmen had to relearn techniques because the masters were gone.

Feb

12

Ru ware

By Ceramic Design



Like Ding ware, Ru (Wade-Giles: ju) was produced in North China for imperial use. The Ru kilns were near the Northern Song capital at Kaifeng. In similar fashion to Longquan celadons, Ru pieces have small amounts of iron in their glaze that oxidize and turn greenish when fired in a reducing atmosphere. Ru wares range in colour—from nearly white to a deep robin’s egg—and often are covered with reddish-brown crackles. The crackles, or “crazing,” are caused when the glaze cools and contracts faster than the body, thus having to stretch and ultimately to split, (as seen in the detail at right; see also ). The art historian James Watt comments that the Song dynasty was the first period that viewed crazing as a merit rather than a defect. Moreover, as time went on, the bodies got thinner and thinner, while glazes got thicker, until by the end of the Southern Song the ‘green-glaze’ was thicker than the body, making it extremely ‘fleshy’ rather than ‘bony,’ to use the traditional analogy (see section on Guan ware, below). Too, the glaze tends to drip and pool slightly, leaving it thinner at the top, where the clay peeps through.

As with Ding ware, the Song imperial court lost access to the Ru kilns after it fled Kaifeng when the Jin invaded, and settled at Lin’an in Hangzhou, towards the south. There the Emperor Gaozong founded the Guan yao (‘official kilns’) right outside the new capital in order to produce imitations of Ru ware. However, posterity has remembered Ru ware as something unmatched by later attempts; Master Gao says, “Compared with Guan yao, the above were of finer substance and more brilliant luster.”