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Jun

30

Tricolor Pottery Figurine of a Military Officer

By Ceramic Design Ideas



Tricolor Pottery Figurine of a Military Officer

Tang dynasty (618-907)

In a he bird hat with a dignified facial expression, this military officer has a high nose bridge, deep eyes, and handlebar-shaped moustache. According to ancient records, he was a bellicose bird. In the Tang dynasty, the he-bird decorating the hat was usually designed like a little sparrow that unfolded its wings with head downward. This piece was donated by Mr. Zheng Zhenduo (1898-1958).

Jun

26

Red Pottery Bowl with Flat Bottom

By Ceramic Design Ideas



Red Pottery Bowl with Flat Bottom

Cishan Culture (ca. 6000-5600 BCE), Neolithic Era (ca. 10000- ca. 2000 BCE)

Pottery of the Cishan culture is dominated by red pottery, and the bowl is one of the most common forms. The Cishan culture is named after the village of Cishan, in Wu’an county, Hebei province, where the first finds of this type were made in 1972. It dates to the Northern China Middle Neolithic, 6000-5600 BC.

Jun

1

High-stemmed Black Pottery Cup

By Ceramic Design



High-stemmed Black Pottery Cup

High-stemmed Black Pottery Cup – Shantung Lung-shan Culture (ca. 2600-2000 BC), Neolithic period. Height: 24 cm, rim diameter: 11 cm, base diameter: 6 cm.

During the Lung-shan Culture, the technique of using a potting wheel to produce ceramic objects was developed. Vessels with very thin walls could be made, and even carved with openwork patterns, in what became known as “egg-shell pottery”. In the kiln, the adding of charcoal at the very end or closing the air intake would create a flux of carbon that creates black pottery.

 

Mar

12

Ceramics throughout the Past Dynasties in the Collection of the Palace Museum

By Ceramic Design



A total of 429 ceramic objects, representing a comprehensive history of the development of Chinese ceramics, comprise this permanent exhibition. The new exhibition incorporates the newest advancements in ancient ceramics research. Housed in an expanded exhibition space, the new exhibition utilizes electronic technology to better educate and interact with viewers. Optimal lighting allows viewers to see the objects more clearly. A specially designed electronic exhibition area, which includes educational films, touch screens and interactive games provide a fun learning experience for children and adults. Moreover, electronic touch screens located throughout the exhibition allow viewers to learn more about the displayed works.
Ceramics throughout the Past Dynasties in the Collection of the Palace Museum

Visiting Information 
Opening times
Ticket sold:8:30—15:30
Openning Hours:8:30—16:30
Last Entry:15:40
Admission:Ticket: 40 rmb/person
           Treasure Gallery: 10 rmb/person
           Clock Gallery: 10 rmb/person
           Children under 120 cm in height are free of charge

Jan

8

Ceramic Tiles

By Ceramic Design



Ceramic tiles have gradually developed through whole flooring industry. These tiles are extensively used as flooring material nowadays. These have certain excellent properties given below.

Ceramic-Tiles

•Strength:
Ceramic floors are extremely strong. They have a breaking strength of about 350-400 kg/cm2.
•Stain free:
Ceramic floors are easiest to clean. They are stain free. They are acid and alkali resistant.
•Scratch resistance:
These tiles have a very high scratch resistance and their hardness is about 6-7 on Moh’s scale (A measure of a mineral hardness and its resistance to scratching).
•Light weight:
Ceramic floors are just 7.5mm thick. This requires a thinner floor sheet than that of mosaic/marble flooring. Read more »

Mar

12

handbuilt ceramic design art

By Ceramic Design



As a freelance ceramic design artist I am involved in the design and making of one off individual, limited edition ceramic pieces. These are made using a combination of handbuilding and slip-casting techniques. The motivation behind my work is to create pieces that are both unusual and striking in terms of shape, decoration and scale. The vessel is the basis upon which to experiment with sculptural ideas, where the ‘pot’ is cut into or added to and works visually from many different angles.

The featured black and white ‘MONO’ range (pic below) derives it’s inspiration from 1960′s op artists such as Bridget Riley and Victor Vassarley. I was interested to see how similar designs would translate to a three dimensional surface and the resulting optical effect. The use of black and white exclusively aims to draw attention to the form while highlighting positive and negative shapes, spaces and patterns. Each vessel is glazed, hand decorated and range between 1 – 3 feet in height.

Feb

26

Joseon Dynasty porcelain

By Ceramic Design



Joseon white porcelain and Buncheong

During the Joseon Dynasty, (1392–1910) ceramic ware was considered to represent the highest quality of achievement from imperial, city, and provincial kilns, the last of which were export-driven wares. This was the golden age of Korean pottery, with a long period of growth in imperial and provincial kilns, and much work of the highest quality still preserved.

Wares evolved along Chinese lines in terms of colour, shape, and technique. Celadon, white porcelain, and storage pottery were similar, but with slight variations in glazes, incision designs, florality, and weight. The Ming influence in blue and white wares using cobalt-blue glazes existed, but without the pthalo blue range, and the three-dimensional glassine colour depth of Ming Dynasty Chinese works.

Simplified designs emerged early on. Buddhist designs still prevailed in celadon wares: lotus flowers, and willow trees. The form most often seen was that of pear-shaped bottles. Notable were thinner glazes, and colourless glazes for buncheong or stoneware.
After the prolonged fall of the Ming dynasty, immigration of some Chinese master potters occurred in southern coastal Korea. Qing colouring, brighter and almost Scythian in enamel imitation, was rejected by Korean potters, in favour of simpler, less decorated wares in keeping with a new dynasty that built itself on military tradition.

Generally, the ceramics of this dynasty is divided into early, middle, and late periods, changing every two centuries, approximately; thus 1300 to 1500 is the early period, 1500 to 1700 the middle, and 1700 to 1900–1910 the late period.

The wares began to assume more traditional Korean glazes and more specific designs to meet regional needs. This is to be expected, as the Scythian art influences were of the former dynasty. The rise of white porcelain occurred as a result of Confucian influence and ideals, resulting in purer, less pretentious forms lacking artifice and complexity.

In 1592 during the Japanese invasion of Korea, entire villages of Korean potters were forcibly relocated to Japan permanently damaging the pottery industry as craftsmen had to relearn techniques because the masters were gone.

Feb

21

Influences – Blue and white porcelain

By Ceramic Design



Influences on Islamic pottery

Further information: Chinese influences on Islamic pottery and İznik pottery

Chinese blue and white ware became extremely popular in the Middle-East from the 14th century, where both Chinese and Islamic types coexisted.

From the 13th century, Chinese pictorial designs, such as flying cranes, dragons and lotus flowers also started to appear in the ceramic productions of the Near-East, especially in Syria and Egypt.

Chinese porcelain of the 14th or 15th century was transmitted to the Middle-East and the Near East, and especially to the Ottoman Empire either through gifts or through war booty. Chinese designs were extremely influential with the pottery manufacturers at Iznik, Turkey. The Ming “grape” design in particular was highly popular and was extensively reproduced under the Ottoman Empire.

Influences on European porcelains

Early influences

Chinese blue-and-white ware were copied in Europe from the 16th century, with the faience blue-and-white technique called alla porcelana. Soon after the first experiments to reproduce the material of Chinese blue-and-white porcelain were made with Medici porcelain. These early works seem to be mixing influences from Islamic as well as Chinese blue-and-white wares.

Direct Chinese imitations

By the beginning of the 17th century Chinese blue and white porcelain was being exported directly to Europe. In the 17th and 18th centuries, Oriental blue and white porcelain was highly prized in Europe and America and sometimes enhanced by fine silver and gold mounts, it was collected by kings and princes.

The European manufacture of porcelain started at Meissen in Germany in 1707. The detailed secrets of Chinese hard-paste porcelain technique were transmitted to Europe through the efforts of the Jesuit Father Francois Xavier d’Entrecolles between 1712 and 1722.

The early wares were strongly influenced by Chinese and other Oriental porcelains and an early pattern was blue onion, which is still in production at the Meissen factory today. The first phase of the French porcelain was also strongly influenced by Chinese designs. Early English porcelain wares were also influenced by Chinese wares and when, for example, the production of porcelain started at Worcester, nearly forty years after Meissen, Oriental blue and white wares provided the inspiration for much of the decoration used. Hand-painted and transfer-printed wares were made at Worcester and at other early English factories in a style known as Chinoiserie. Many other European factories followed this trend. In Delft, Netherlands blue and white ceramics taking their designs from Chinese export porcelains made for the Dutch market were made in large numbers throughout the 17th Century. Blue and white Delftware was itself extensively copied by factories in other European countries, including England, where it is known as English Delftware.

Patterns

The plate shown in the illustration (left) is decorated with the famous willow pattern and was probably made at a factory in the English county of Staffordshire. Such is the persistence of the willow pattern that it is difficult to date the piece shown with any precision; it is possibly quite recent but similar wares have been produced by English factories in huge numbers over long periods and are still being made today. The willow pattern, said to tell the sad story of a pair of star-crossed lovers, was an entirely European design, though one that was strongly influenced in style by design features borrowed from Chinese export porcelains of the 18th Century. The willow pattern was, in turn, copied by Chinese potters, but with the decoration hand painted rather than transfer-printed.

Feb

18

14th century development Blue and white porcelain

By Ceramic Design



In the early 14th century mass-production of fine, translucent, blue and white porcelain started at Jingdezhen, sometimes called the porcelain capital of China. This development was due to the combination of Chinese techniques and Islamic trade. The new ware was made possible by the export of cobalt from Persia (called Huihui qing, 回回青, “Islamic blue”), combined with the translucent white quality of Chinese porcelain. Cobalt blue was considered as a precious commodity, with a value about twice that of gold.Motifs also draw inspiration from Islamic decorations. A large portion of these blue-and-white wares was then shipped to Southwest-Asian markets through the Muslim traders based in Guangzhou.

Chinese blue and white porcelain was once-fired: after the porcelain body was dried, decorated with refined cobalt-blue pigment mixed with water and applied using a brush, coated with a clear glaze and fired at high temperature. From the 16th century, local sources of cobalt blue started to be developed, although Persian cobalt remained the most expensive. Production of blue and white wares has continued at Jingdezhen to this day. Blue and white porcelain made at Jingdezhen probably reached the height of its technical excellence during the reign of the Kangxi emperor of the Qing Dynasty (reigned 1661 to 1722).

Feb

18

Tang and Song blue-and-white

By Ceramic Design



The first Chinese blue and white wares were as early as the ninth century in Henan province, China; although only shards have been discovered. Tang period blue-and-white is even rarer than Song blue-and-white and was unknown before 1985. The Tang pieces are not porcelain however, but rather earthenwares with greenish white slip, using cobalt blue pigments which probably originated in the Middle-East.The only three pieces of complete “Tang blue and white” in the world were recovered from Indonesian Belitung shipwreck in 1998 and later sold to Singapore.