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Jan

3

Double-gourd-shaped Vase Decorated with Bats

By Ceramic Design Ideas



Qianlong reign (1736-1795), Qing dynasty (1644-1911)

The double-gourd-shaped vase has a straight mouth, short neck, and a smaller upper bulb compared with the lower one which gracefully terminates in a narrow, slightly upturned foot. The interior wall is applied with turquoise glaze and the exterior with red cloud-like bat designs on the blue-green-glazed ground. At the bottom inside the foot ring, grouped in three lines within a single-line crimson frame, are six crimson characters in seal script reading “Made in the Qianlong period of the Great Qing” (Daqing Qianlong nian zhi).
  Vessels in gourd shapes are typical among traditional Chinese porcelain productions. Based on some of its characteristics such as its intertwining tendrils and profuse seeds (in Chinese, the character for “seed” [zi] is homophonic with the character for “offspring”), the gourd is often connected with auspicious meanings such as abundance and fertility. The gourd was also considered a holy object for Daoist practice. Over the centuries, it was believed that people with miraculous powers were able to use gourd as a vehicle to enter the land of the immortals. At the same time, it is also used as containers for Daoist elixirs of immortality. The pattern decorating the vase is also intended as a rebus in which great fortune and blessing (“hongfu” in Chinese) are represented by image of the red bats (also pronounced “hongfu”).
  Both the elegant, round shape and the bat pattern help us to glimpse how “fortune” was understood and celebrated during the Qianlong reign.

Double-gourd-shaped Vase Decorated with Bats

Jul

7

Blue-and-white Jar with Designs of Interlocking Peony and Dragon among Clouds

By Ceramic Design Ideas



Blue-and-white Jar

 

 

Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368)

The jar is decorated with five cobalt blue patterns from the mouth rim to the bottom. The most notable one is the central design featuring dragons among clouds. Typical of the Yuan dynasty, the dragon has a small head, thin neck, long body and three-claw paw, looking ferocious.

Jul

7

Underglaze-red Vase with Carved Floral Design

By Ceramic Design Ideas



Underglaze-red Vase with Carved Floral Design

 

 

Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368)

This vessel is decorated with underglze-red motif and incised patterns. The red motif is bright but has blur outlines, reflecting the characteristics of underglaze-red wares in early Yuan dynasty.

Jul

4

Moon-white Tripod Incense Burner with Double Ears, Jun Ware

By Ceramic Design Ideas



Moon-white Tripod Incense Burner with Double Ears, Jun Ware

 

 

Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368)

Jun kiln is located in site at Yuzhou city, Henan province This is a typical Jun ware. The moon-white glaze is smooth with luster. The dark clay color can be seen through thin glaze in some areas. Curvy lines, known as “earthworm marks”, are clearly shown in the glaze, one of the characteristics of the Jun wares.

Jul

3

Four-handled Vase

By Ceramic Design Ideas



Four-handled Vase

 

Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368)

Cizhou kiln is located in Handan, Hebei province In the Yuan dynasty, the Cizhou kiln mainly produced white glazed wares with black motifs, characterized with big size and thick bodies. Big basins, big jars, and pillows were major products. Dragon among clouds, phoenix among clouds, wild goose among clouds, and fish and grass were popular decoration patterns.

Jul

1

Polychrome Beaker Vase with Design of Peony and Magnolia

By Ceramic Design Ideas



Polychrome Beaker Vase

Shunzhi Reign (1644-1661), Qing Dynasty (1644-1911)

In the Qing dynasty Shunzhi era, polychrome porcelain shapes retained the antique flavor of late Ming dynasty. Many vessels employed a strong contrast between vivid hues of vermillion and green boldly painted in unrestrained fashion. The body of this beaker vase (gu) has white glaze with blue-green specks, polychrome-painted with distinct images of irregular rocks, flowers, and other designs. Each color is vibrant, with visual effects presented clearly with a refined sense of beauty.

Jun

30

Tricolor Pottery Figurine of a Military Officer

By Ceramic Design Ideas



Tricolor Pottery Figurine of a Military Officer

Tang dynasty (618-907)

In a he bird hat with a dignified facial expression, this military officer has a high nose bridge, deep eyes, and handlebar-shaped moustache. According to ancient records, he was a bellicose bird. In the Tang dynasty, the he-bird decorating the hat was usually designed like a little sparrow that unfolded its wings with head downward. This piece was donated by Mr. Zheng Zhenduo (1898-1958).

Jun

28

Celadon Vase with a Dish-shaped Mouth, Longquan Ware

By Ceramic Design Ideas



Celadon Vase

Southern Song Dynasty (1127-1279)

Longquan kiln is located in Longquan, Zhejiang province This celadon vase with a dish-shaped mouth distinguishes itself with its elegant shape and pure, beautiful glaze. The color and quality of the powder-blue glaze reflect the most consummate skill of firing celadon wares in Chinese history. The special glaze material of Longquan wares of the Southern Song dynasty was highly adhesive and high-temperature resisting. Therefore, the glaze would not fall down during firing. Powder blue and plum green are the two most famous glaze colors. The plum-green glaze is thicker than 1.5 millimeters, showing jade-like luster.

Jun

28

Blue-and-white Prunus Vase with Design of Dragon among Clouds

By Ceramic Design Ideas



 

Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368)

Decoration patterns on the blue-and-white porcelain wares of the Yuan dynasty borrowed designs from textiles. The widely used hanging cloud designs and the S-shaped cloud designs were evolved from the shoulder decoration in Chinese traditional opera costumes. The shoulder of the vase is decorated with hanging cloud designs.

Jun

26

Black Pottery Pot with Double Rings

By Ceramic Design Ideas



Black Pottery Pot with Double Rings

Longshan Culture (ca. 2400-2000 BCE), Neolithic Era (ca. 10000- ca. 2000 BCE)

The black pottery was fired in a strongly reducing atmosphere (lacking oxygen); during the last stage of firing the fire was extinguished, the kiln was closed, and water was poured from the top chimney; carbon element from the fuel infiltrated the ceramic wall through the steam. Longshan is a Late Neolithic culture. It was named after Longshan village, Zhangqiu county, Shandong province where it was first recognized in 1928. The vessel was made on a rotating wheel which became common during the Longshan culture, and vessels became thinner than before